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A Safe Space to Gather

Each month, we post a series of blogs around a common topic. This month, Jessica Tate is curating a series that will reflect experiences of living in diverse community. Over the course of the month, we’ll notice practices that enable diverse communities to thrive and we’ll reflect on the promise of Christ in whom there is no Jew nor Greek, no male nor female, no slave nor free and what that promise means for our lives today. We invite you to share your own thoughts on Facebook and Twitter

by Leslie King

There is so much important work being done on diversity across our nation. Whether in public rallies, conversations on college campuses, city governance meetings, or around our family dinner tables, we all recognize the diversity challenge is not simple. Not only do we realize the unfinished work of the Civil Rights movement, we are also experiencing the disenfranchisement of the white working class that seeks to insert itself into the diversity conversation. More than ever, diversity requires intentionality and integrity.  

Intentionality found the First Presbyterian Church of Waco, just recently on August 20, when the Democratic and Republican parties of our county, led by an intelligent young millennial, requested to use the “safe space” of our sanctuary for a public gathering for racial unity. With intention, the political parties wanted to stand together and declare honor and respect for the diverse world in which we live.  

In the wake of their request, First Presbyterian engaged their own intentionality. Ask anyone in Waco: we are not a venue and we think critically about the way our space is shared. Will it strengthen the common good? We had to admit, it felt good to be asked to use the space. In the wake of Charlottesville, we all wanted to do something to respond. But our Session asked deeper questions, like who would be involved in such a gathering for racial unity? We knew that this was more a “left-leaning” sort of event. The request had been from both parties, but who specifically would be speaking and what would the message be? Would this be a biased gathering about diversity with an anemic call from like-minded voices?  

The organizers wrestled with our questions and with the details of the event. They made a courageous decision. They did not look for middle of the road mindsets. Each invited speaker was strong and passionate from a specific perspective. The event agenda revealed a balance between Democrat and Republican mindsets. Confirmed speakers gathered for a pre-event dinner where they discussed tone, etiquette, and content. All were given a time limit. As the evening arrived, individuals from so many walks of Waco life arrived to the sanctuary. A couple of news channels and the local paper were represented. Each speaker approached the podium with a tentativeness. Their posture and opening remarks confessed appreciation for the unusual opportunity to speak to such a diverse group of people. The tone was respectful and the content was provocative.  

The president of the local Republican club began his speech, “I am the most conservative person in this room. I believe we pull ourselves up by our boot straps. But I have come learn that many people are never even allowed to imagine their possibilities. Racism is real and we must work to eliminate it.” The Democratic party chair began her speech with a tender voice, “It has always been my dream to share a podium with the Republican party chair. I’m so glad to be here tonight.” The NAACP president of Waco cited a local Anglo pastor as the best example of leadership for a multi-cultural bi-lingual congregation.  As we listened to each speech, the room seemed to fill with the Spirit. Not only were we were talking about diversity, we were modeling and identifying concrete examples of it in our own community.       

The two political parties asked First Presbyterian for our sanctuary that it might be a “safe space.” We agreed to share our space that we might all address our biases and pursue diversity. Those organizers rose to the challenge of our questions. Diversity’s spirit manifested itself. By the end of the evening, we were no longer were as concerned about feeling safe because our confidence and trust were growing.  


Leslie King received her BA from Kansas University (’91) and her Masters of Divinity from McCormick Presbyterian Theological Seminary in Chicago (‘94). In 2010 she completed her Doctor of Ministry at Saint Paul School of Theology in Kansas City Missouri with an emphasis in Spirituality and Organizational Change. She has been married to DJ King since November of 1996. They are the parents of three children: Cody, Katie, and Claire. Leslie enjoys reading, quilting, walking her dogs by the lake and the Texas heat. 

Our Commitment to Racial Diversity

Each month, we post a series of blogs around a common topic. This month, Jessica Tate is curating a series that will reflect experiences of living in diverse community. Over the course of the month, we’ll notice practices that enable diverse communities to thrive and we’ll reflect on the promise of Christ in whom there is no Jew nor Greek, no male nor female, no slave nor free and what that promise means for our lives today. We invite you to share your own thoughts on Facebook and Twitter

by Aram Bae

Recently a colleague asked me about the racial make-up at the church where I work. Simply put, his question was: “How many non-whites are in your congregation?” It was an easy question to answer, for I could count on one hand the folks who came to mind. While my number may be wrong in terms of actual membership, the headcount is accurate for consistent worship attendance. It’s easy to make that kind of headcount out of a sea of white faces. It, in fact, comes naturally to me; I do this wherever I am, be it at a coffee shop, on the bus, at a lecture, in a restaurant—any time and everywhere, instinctively.

Photo from First Pres Charlottesville Facebook page

The PC(USA) denomination isn’t entirely white, but we’re also not balanced in our racial make-up. According to the new PC(USA) Church Trends site, approximately 8.75% of members identified as Asian, 9.3% identified as African American, 7.69% identified as black, 4.6% identified as Hispanic, and 96.25% identified as white in 2016—just to name a few. We do, however, know when and how to showcase our commitment to diversity, especially racial diversity. It’s good for press, and we’ve got Scripture to back-up our efforts. We pat ourselves on the back for being progressive in this way, and we make efforts to keep moving forward holding hands with non-white peers. Our “progress,” however, can be felt as more of a political ploy than a commitment for partnership. Simply ask a person of color the contexts in which s/he has been invited to speak, preach, teach, keynote, or pray for the denomination on the basis of an event that is NOT about race or diversity. Yes, I’m talking about multicultural tokenism. It still exists, and we progressive Presbyterians play a role in perpetuating the diversity game—we play it when we need it; when it makes us look good.

I have mixed feelings about being a racially and ethnically diverse church. On one hand, how beautiful of an image. On the other hand, as a person of color, sometimes all I want is to be among my people and feel like a majority, even if for a few hours of one day out of a long week when I’m surrounded by anything but a sea of Asian faces. I support our denomination’s efforts in wanting to be diverse—theologically, politically, socially, and racially/ethnically. It’s biblical and right and good. But I also shed a cautionary light to those who are doing the asking. Rather than asking folks to fill a diversity need, we may want to consider asking: “What do you need from me/us?” In other words, turn the tables a bit. Give up your seat of power of doing the asking for your need to be filled, and practice some listening instead. In this way, we just might do as Paul encourages his dearest friends in Philippi: “Put yourself aside, and help others get ahead. Don’t be obsessed with getting your own advantage. Forget yourselves long enough to lend a helping hand.” (Philippians 2:3, The Message translation). The helping hand, in this case, is to be a listening partner. Perhaps it’s time for our denomination to put the “progressive” aside a bit, and simply listen. Simply put, it’s long overdue.


Aram Bae is associate pastor for youth and mission at First Presbyterian Church in Charlottesville, VA, and serves on the NEXT Church strategy team. 

 

2017 National Gathering Keynote: Soong-Chan Rah

Dr. Soong-Chan Rah, Milton B. Engebretson Professor of Church Growth and Evangelism at North Park Theological Seminary in Chicago, IL, presents a keynote at the 2017 NEXT Church National Gathering entitled: “The Changing Face of the Church.”


Soong-Chan Rah is Milton B. Engebretson Professor of Church Growth and Evangelism at North Park Theological Seminary in Chicago, IL and the author of The Next EvangelicalismMany ColorsProphetic Lament; co-author of Forgive Us; and Return to Justice.

Soong-Chan is formerly the founding Senior Pastor of Cambridge Community Fellowship Church (CCFC), a multi-ethnic church living out the values of racial reconciliation and social justice in the urban context. He currently serves on the board of World Vision and Evangelicals 4 Justice. He has previously served on the board of Sojourners and the Christian Community Development Association.

Soong-Chan received his B.A. from Columbia University; his M.Div. from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary; his Th.M. from Harvard University; his D.Min. from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, and his Th.D. from Duke University.

Soong-Chan and his wife Sue and their two children, Annah and Elijah live in Chicago.

2015 National Gathering Keynote: Tiffany Jana and Matthew Freeman

Tiffany Jana and Matthew Freeman co-owners of the TMI consulting firm based in Richmond, VA, present a keynote at the 2015 National Gathering in Chicago.

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