CATEGORY: Mission Engagement

Moving Beyond Sexy Ministry

Initially, I thought this was a very effective way to lead – especially given the fact that most of what I’d seen growing up gave me the impression that ministry effectiveness is about the numbers. However, as I grew and became more experienced as a ministry leader, I started to become ambivalent and increasingly weary with the “sexy ministry” approach. 

Cultivated Ministry at The Board of Pensions

Asking the theological “why?” has transformed the Board and its programs. This theological understanding is embedded in everything we do, seeking well-being for those who serve Christ’s Church in the four critical arenas of health, spirituality, finance, and vocation.

When Numbers Become Our Identity

When we worship a set of numbers, they become our identity. We are rewarded or punished by what we believe these numbers say about us.

Field Guide Preview: Cultivated Ministry

Today, we’re excited to share the first sneak peek of the Field Guide for Cultivated Ministry, which we’ll release in full this fall. This preview is from the guide’s introduction, which debuts the concept of “cultivated ministry” and defines its four movements: theology, accountability, learning, and storytelling.

Skipping A Step: Resisting the Quick Fix and Embracing Evaluation

As we wrestled with these questions, we learned that we had skipped a step in our efforts to quickly address our congregational crises. We had moved directly from the observations of our perceived problems to interventions we thought would address them.

Cultivated Ministry: A New Approach

A few years ago, NEXT Church convened some creative, talented leaders to talk together about the ways in which the church is collaboratively starting and supporting new ministries. In the room were leaders from large, established congregations, leaders from small upstart ministry ventures, and everything in between.

Evangelicalism as Community Problem-Solving

From my seat in the pew, evangelicalism became a sullied tradition because of confusion between outputs and outcomes. This is not a semantic point; instead it actualizes a severe disregard for building covenantal relationships.